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Post 0

Thursday, September 16, 2004 - 1:46pmSanction this postReply
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Charlize Theron is so hot, I can't stand it. How's that for an intellectual comment?



Post 1

Thursday, September 16, 2004 - 1:53pmSanction this postReply
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She is one of the most classically beautiful women I have ever seen.  Her face looks as if an artist fashioned it from a flawless piece of marble.  You have good taste, Scott.  :)

J




Post 2

Thursday, September 16, 2004 - 5:21pmSanction this postReply
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From your photo, you aren't too hard on the eyes, either! I should update mine--I look horrible!

Not to thread-hijack, but I drool all over myself over Angelina Jolie the most. Until I remember what is between her ears, and realize that she may well be clinically insane. Even if not, she is one ugly, confused person. My strong streak of empathy makes me want to feel sorry for her, until I remember that is is about 30 and should have starting sorting her life out by now.

BTW, dinner this evening was a fantastic Thai dish--Panang Chicken, with a side of Spring Rolls. My word, I love Thai. Of course, I didn't cook it--found a new Thai restuarant 1 block from my train. Dangerous.

So that I have said ~something~ relevant: I liked Men of Honor because I found a great message. Namely, ability will overcome prejudice. And competent, productive people share a kinship more important than color or culture.



Post 3

Thursday, September 16, 2004 - 6:51pmSanction this postReply
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Thank you, Scott.  :)

I love Thai very much as well.  I'm experimenting with a recipe for Panang myself...yum!

But, uh, that belongs on the "Food" board, so yes, I also enjoyed this movie and found it to be of the utmost quality.  Should be nominated for something.

J




Post 4

Thursday, September 16, 2004 - 8:07pmSanction this postReply
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Jennifer,

I love Thai very much as well.  I'm experimenting with a recipe for Panang myself...yum!
 
This probably belongs on the "Food" board as well, but your, "yum," reminded me of one of my favorite Thai dishes, tom yum. I learned to love and cook Thai in Thailand in the 60s. Here's a culinary question for you--what's mang dah, (or manang dinah, as it is called in Laos) If you do not already know (which would not be surprising, it is a bit esoteric) when you find out, you might be put off by it, but I assure you it is marvelous.

(Hint, the word in Thai means gigolo. ;>)

Here's one more, because you cannot really cook thai without it. What is priky nhu?

Hint:


Regi 




Post 5

Thursday, September 16, 2004 - 10:48pmSanction this postReply
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Hmmm.....I don't know what that is, Regi.  And now I'm afraid to know.  ;)

As far as priky nhu, if those are dried chilis, I have them in my pantry.  Nonetheless, their official name really makes me want to make a juvenile joke.  Thai food names do that to me.  ;)

Jennifer




Post 6

Friday, September 17, 2004 - 10:08amSanction this postReply
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Tom yum and tom kha kai are both ~extraordinary~ thai soups. I could eat Thai every day. One of the guys I am most jealous of is a guy I used to work with, who in the 70's was stationed in Thailand. The stories of poverty and prostitution were pretty terrible. But the glorious, wonderful food that could be had for a song is incredible. He rented his own room off base (he was Air Force) for about $5 a month, and for a couple of dollars, his live-in girlfriend at the time could prepare a week's worth of unbelievable food. Or you could go out to eat, and spend maybe 2 dollars and eat like a king. His girlfriend was a better cook than those at most of the restuarants, and she preferred that, too, because he let her keep the left over grocery money.



Post 7

Friday, September 17, 2004 - 11:36amSanction this postReply
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Jennifer,

It is nothing, "gross," though it may sound like it. (Think shrimp or crayfish.) Mang dah is a rice beetle up to four inches long which makes its appearance in many Thai dishes and sauces. It is (especially the prised males) very aromatic (more like cheese than spice), and is eaten raw, roasted, and in many sauces. It is unlikely, however, you will find them in any Thai restaurants in this country.

The peppers in the picture and in your pantry are the dried version of priky nhu. Fresh, they come in a variety of colors, deep green, yellow, orange, and red, like the dry ones. They are frequently sliced into little rings and used in dipping sauces. I always have a bag of them in my refrigerator and another in my freezer (they keep well frozen up to 6 months or more). I frequently cut up four or five and sprinkle them on noodle dishes, or even a salad.

I use the dry ones on pizza. I used to have a bag of them where I worked, and when the company sometimes bought pizza for a meeting I would take them to put on my pizza. Despite my warnings there was always someone who insisted they liked hot peppers and would put them on their pizza. They seldom stayed for the whole meeting.

Regi




Post 8

Friday, September 17, 2004 - 11:48amSanction this postReply
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Hi Scott,

You have good reason to be jealous of your friend. I spent two years in Thailand (military civilian duty) in the early 60s. It was a very different country in many respects than just ten years later.

In the 60s, there were restaurants in Bangkok, and some of the larger cities, (about three, I think), but even in Bangkok, some of the best meals I ever had were from the street vendors who carry their "restaurants" on their shoulders by means of a yoke with a hibachi and pan of rice (usually jasmine) on one end and all their ingredients in a basket on the other. (They are still very common even today.)

They would prepare the food right where you stopped them in the street and wrap it up in a banana leaf. Cost one or two bhat. Bhat is their paper money. One bhat was, in those days, the equivalent of five cents.

I was talking to a Cambodian friend of mine the other day, and we were discussing the similarities in Thai and Cambodian culture. One of his comments was, "the Thais smile a lot more than the Cambodians." They do. They are a delightful fun-living people.

Regi




Post 9

Friday, September 17, 2004 - 6:03pmSanction this postReply
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How on earth did a post about an American movie turn into a discussion about Thai food, (which I cook and eat about twice a week ! :-) }.
No-one has commented on the wine and cheese I note rather sourly.
Please, at least watch the movie.  Carl Brashear does deserve this much!
Untill.
Cass




Post 10

Friday, September 17, 2004 - 8:05pmSanction this postReply
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Well, SCOTT started it.  ;)

Fantastic movie though, Cass -- sorry we've hijacked your thread. 

Jennifer

P.S.  Gentlemen, since the topic of SOLO Food this month is Thai, the least you could do is move your asses over there and make my board look a ~little~ more active.  Linz will stop paying me the big bucks if it doesn't turn into a hot spot soon.  ;)




Post 11

Saturday, September 18, 2004 - 2:37pmSanction this postReply
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Oh sure, blame it on me! Well, okay, I guess it was my fault. Sorry for hi-jacking. Maybe this will help:

Did anyone notice that in Men of Honour, ~no one~ ate Thai food?



Post 12

Wednesday, September 29, 2004 - 12:50pmSanction this postReply
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For those of us in the Naval Service (Navy and Marines), Thailand is the spot to to go.  It's not about the food, though. ;-)




Post 13

Saturday, May 7, 2005 - 1:53pmSanction this postReply
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This movie is phenomenal.  It presents a man standing against all odds and opposition to achieve his highest goal.  It is one of my favorites!



Post 14

Sunday, May 8, 2005 - 3:45pmSanction this postReply
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I don't find either Charlize Theron or Angelina Jolie physically attractive. Neither one turns me on. My tastes in women are somewhat strange.

To make it worse, I don't like Thai food either. And, as far as military movies or movies about heroism, "Men of Honour" didn't work for me nearly as well as "An Officer and a Gentleman" (1982--Richard Gere) or "Courage Under Fire" (1996--Meg Ryan, Denzel Washington...directed with skill and subtlety by the wonderful Edward Zwick) or "Saving Private Ryan".



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