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Post 20

Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 7:21pmSanction this postReply
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probably not,...

Anyone got a cigar?

---Landon




Post 21

Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 8:14pmSanction this postReply
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It wasn't alzheimers, but did start with "A"...don't have the book anymore, but it was something like arteclerosis, something to that effect...



Post 22

Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 8:18pmSanction this postReply
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Ah, found it on the web: arteriosclerosis.

A hardening of the arteries. Multi-infarct dementia is a form of dementia caused by large numbers of small blood clots (emboli) in the brain that starve the brain cells of oxygen.


http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/multiinfarctdementia.htm



Post 23

Sunday, September 18, 2005 - 2:26pmSanction this postReply
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A hardening of the arteries. Multi-infarct dementia is a form of dementia caused by large numbers of small blood clots (emboli) in the brain that starve the brain cells of oxygen.
aka "Strom Thurmond".




Post 24

Sunday, September 18, 2005 - 8:45pmSanction this postReply
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?



Post 25

Monday, September 19, 2005 - 6:36amSanction this postReply
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Good one Robert!



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Post 26

Monday, September 19, 2005 - 3:29pmSanction this postReply
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To make a post in relation to the article:

I was diagnosed with adult ADD at age 18. I was alerted that my adolescent substance use was me trying to "fix" myself. I have run the full gamut of ADD medication, all amphetamines or analogues. 
I knew something about this wasn't right, but was basically told there was no 100% solution. I was not living consciously. I was the product of a broken family, and did not have the tools to cope. I also had a IQ at the tiny right hand side of the bell curve, but didn't know how to use it. I had dropped out of college multiple times (6 total I believe).

Then around 23 I read the Fountainhead. Then at 24 I read Atlas Shrugged. Then I started thinking more clearly. I started reading Aristotle, and learning what logic was. Then I read a few books to help deal with the emotional psyche, and was able to interrelate them to my teachings on logic. I stopped taking my medication. My "ADD" went away.

I've since been able to think with razor sharp precision, I no longer have issues with routine, or self-control. I have learned how to heal my wounds and move on.

Basically, I grew up and learned to think.

(Edited by Donald Talton on 9/19, 3:29pm)




Post 27

Monday, September 19, 2005 - 4:30pmSanction this postReply
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Donald-

Thanks for sharing that.  My hat's off to you.  Sanctioned.




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Post 28

Thursday, September 22, 2005 - 1:39amSanction this postReply
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Re: Post 12 by Jody
The subject was female, and she didn't just "have a bad" day. She was unable to pass basic competency tests in the public school system.

Part of what I did for this teacher was admister IQ tests. He was pretty objective about the process--giving several different types of IQ tests over time to and making comparisons of the results. I believed the data. I've also seen psychological evaluations where children who are physically abused or neglected lose IQ points, going from 110 to 80, so I would think if you can go down, you can go up. It has to do with the quantity and quality of the neural pathways.

Re: post 26
(Donald, maybe you didn't have ADD. Maybe you were a hedonist?)

ADD is a memory problem, and it is also related to sensory experience, particularly auditory and kinesthetic sensory experience. The person is bombarded with stimuli and is always "on," so-to-speak. Their brains are in deep concentration all the time, so it is hard to shut down and fall asleep on regular cycles. Contrary to the name "attention deficit" it is actually a hyperfocus ability. ADD is a misnomer.

The ADD person's ability for making creative connections can be remarkable--because of the amount of data received. But, they may not remember where they left their glasses or what model car their friend drives. It's as if nature needed to compensate for the broader sensory awareness--so something in memory had to give.

One book I read on it, Thom Hartman's book on the Hunter-Farmer theory of ADD, gives the illustration of a deer herd. They are all chowing down on grass. The "non-ADD" majority, for lack of better terminology, are eating peacefully. But, there is a small percentage of the herd, maybe only one or two, that will be attuned to slight sounds in the distance, like the footsteps of a mountain lion. The "ADD" deer will jolt upright and bolt when it hears or senses the slight rustling sound, thereby alerting the group to the danger. The others follow and run, though they did not hear the approaching predator.

I'm not sure what "ADD" is. But, I do know that sensory abilities vary amongst people and affect how they react to situations. These sensory abilities are mutable with effort or dimished with non-effort. It's similar to the variance in eyesight. Some people have 20/20 all their lives. Others develop into 20/20. Others would be evolutionary dead ends were it not for glasses...But, for someone who has ADD, you can't just tell them to "think" their way out of it. It's like telling someone who needs glasses to just see better.

A person should do whatever they can to improve their reasoning ability. Can the person with ADD learn systems to find their keys and glasses? Of course. But, for others, the idea of not knowing where their keys or glasses are at all times is unimaginable.

I've heard accounts of Einstein leaving his house without pants on, or calling his wife to find out where he was suppose to be going. It's been postulated that Einstein had "Asperger's syndrome," which I think is somewhere on the continuum with the other memory "deficit" disorders...That's just my own hypothesis, although maybe someone else has more information on this?

Which brings me to another question. Does anyone know Objectivist scholars whose fields are psychology or neuroscience? I would love to know who they are. Thanks.

~Allison



Post 29

Thursday, September 22, 2005 - 10:56amSanction this postReply
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I just sanctioned your post Allison. I was diagnosed with ADD at around 7 or 8 and was on Ritalin until I was 14, when my mother gave me the choice of continueing to take it or not. I chose not to, and don't regret that descision. While I don't have the "lost glasses" issue (my whole family is well known for their good memory abilities,) I do have the bombarded by stimuli and troiuble sleeping parts. Focusing on just one thing can often be difficualt, but not impossible. I'll write more on this later.

Ethan




Post 30

Thursday, September 22, 2005 - 5:32amSanction this postReply
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I am 42 years old, didn't go to college until I was 39.  I am diagnosed as having adult A.D.D. My G.P.A. has never been below 3.75 since I went back to school and for most semesters has been 4.0  I have continued to work and earn a living during this time and I fully expect to go all the way to an advanced post graduate degree! 
When this happens, the best part of it will be knowing that it has everything to do with creating my own coping mechanisms and nothing to do with receiving amateur behavior modification from smug, pedantic little reactionaries.




Post 31

Thursday, September 22, 2005 - 8:17pmSanction this postReply
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Allison:
"Does anyone know Objectivist scholars whose fields are psychology or neuroscience?"

Robert Efron - the "father of cognitive neurology" and one of the most productive contributors to the foundations of neuroscience - was a close intellectual associate of Ayn Rand. He should be a good starting point. Then use the "Science Citations Index" to find work that follows up on Robert Efron's.




Post 32

Thursday, September 22, 2005 - 8:21pmSanction this postReply
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Allison-
Thanks for the response.

He was pretty objective about the process--giving several different types of IQ tests over time to and making comparisons of the results. I believed the data.

Where did he publish his findings, and where was the data verified by independent, double-blind studies?  What were the controls he used?  What type of tests were administered by him?  Were they the same as those used in previous testings?  If not, what was the difference?  These are just a few questions to begin the evaluation of his findings.

(Edited by Jody Allen Gomez on 9/22, 8:25pm)




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Post 33

Thursday, September 22, 2005 - 8:49pmSanction this postReply
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"Where. . .was the data verified by independent, double-blind studies?"

Oh, yes. Since human beings are all interchangeable units, and since none of them possesses the faculty of volition, such "studies" will doubtless reveal the Truth.

Ignorance is bliss, I guess.

JR



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Post 34

Thursday, September 22, 2005 - 9:29pmSanction this postReply
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Ignorance is bliss, I guess.
You're a fucking a parrot aren't you?  This is the second time in two days I've seen you trot out this brilliant cliche.

You of all people should know Jeff.




Post 35

Thursday, September 22, 2005 - 9:34pmSanction this postReply
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But fuck that Jeff, once again you are not going to hide behind your ridiculous invectives.  You are going to pose some sort of logical argument or shut up.

Since human beings are all interchangeable units, and since none of them possesses the faculty of volition, such "studies" will doubtless reveal the Truth.

Explain this statement.  How does the scientific method vitiate volition Jeff?  How did my statement equivocate humans with 'interchangeable units'?  How did it imply that humans do not possess the faculty of volition?




Post 36

Friday, September 23, 2005 - 6:36amSanction this postReply
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Allison,
Jay Friedenberg, who regularly attends the TOC Summer Seminar and is on the faculty of Manhattan College, has just co-authored an undergraduate text entitled Cognitive Science. An Introduction to the Study of Mind.  He describes it as
an undergraduate textbook that summarizes major historical theories of mind from different disciplinary perspectives including psychology, philosophy, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, networks, evolution, linguistics, artificial intelligence and robotics. It is written at an introductory level with all concepts explained so it can be understood by the lay reader with no background knowledge in these areas.

I haven't read it yet, so I can't recommend it on that basis.  But I know Jay, and I intend to read it soon since I expect it to be excellent.

I should add that SOLO's Robert Campbell and Walter Foddis are two more who definitely fit your criteria.
Thanks,
Glenn


(Edited by Glenn Fletcher on 9/23, 7:44am)




Post 37

Friday, September 23, 2005 - 10:49amSanction this postReply
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Anyone who thinks he or she has ADD might try a sugar-free diet for a few weeks to see if that helps. There is no science behind this, just stories.

--Brant




Post 38

Sunday, October 23, 2005 - 1:02amSanction this postReply
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Returning after self-imposed hiatus to sort out family issues...

Thanks Adam (#31) and Glenn (#36) for the leads to Objectivists' works (Efron, Friedenberg, et al) on mind studies. I am reading about physics right now, but I'm sure my attention willl shift back to the evolution of human consciousness soon...

RE Jody's post #32: I apologize. I don't recall the publications and did not investigate the nature of the studies. (I worked for him for a summer in 1994.) The case study was brought up in the context of him explaining why he started the tutoring center he owned. His findings led him to work with another scientist to develop software that helped improve learning abilities in children--to decrease hemispheric dominance, basically. I tried to find information through Google, but another James MacDonald--(who also coincidentally studies cognitive development and teaching theories--bizarre)--turned up--at jamesmacdonald.org...



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