[an error occurred while processing this directive]
About
Content
Store
Forum

Rebirth of Reason
War
People
Archives
Objectivism

Post to this threadMark all messages in this thread as readMark all messages in this thread as unreadBack one pagePage 0Page 1


Sanction: 5, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 5, No Sanction: 0
Post 20

Monday, May 15, 2006 - 10:31amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit

Tidbit

In the Appendix to her new book, Professor Smith discusses egoist friendship. In a footnote, she remarks that Rand "believes that love can provide a unique type of self-awareness or visibility" (290). Smith neglected to give any references for this view of Rand's.

The chief exposition of this fond view of Rand's is an essay in Rand's journal The Objectivist. It was written by Nathaniel Branden, and it is reprinted as the third of the essays assembled in Friendship: A Philosophical Reader, Neera Badhwar, editor.

The dawn of the self-mirror view of romantic love is Rand's exquisite rendition of Dagny Taggart and John Galt together that night of nights in the railway tunnel, at the real climax of Atlas Shrugged (956-57).

Sanction: 5, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 5, No Sanction: 0
Post 21

Monday, May 15, 2006 - 3:11pmSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
That passage from Comte is nearly impossible to find--I managed to obtain a copy of the book after looking for it for several years. So I can appreciate her having to cite the passage from my work. (Must have pained her to have to do that. It implies having to trust a heretic.)

Sanction: 5, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 5, No Sanction: 0
Post 22

Monday, May 15, 2006 - 6:37pmSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
Steve Shmurak, I appreciate the notes on preprints. I am not well read on Tomkins, and will use the time until publication to acquaint myself with his work (and that of his institute).

It seems to me that the neuroscience of emotion has hit a galloping stride in the last ten years (as the Damasio talk demonstrates in part -- I urge those who wonder if there is anything interesting vis-a-vis Objectivism in the neuroscience to give the earlier cited Damasio talk a listen. The sound is a touch scratchy, but Damasio is a fluent expositor) -- it is of great moment to me that the O-ist world gives serious, thoughtful attention to these findings. I appreciate all the cites and comments given here.


WSS

Sanction: 5, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 5, No Sanction: 0
Post 23

Monday, May 15, 2006 - 7:44pmSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
Funny that Damasio is mentioned here-- he is heading a new Institute for the Study of the Brain and Creativity at USC and I am applying to USC for grad school. I might--- if I get in--- be studying with/near Damasio. I'm interested in the interaction between volition and emotion.

Sanction: 4, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 4, No Sanction: 0
Post 24

Tuesday, May 16, 2006 - 7:35amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
Tibor,

I take your point about the pain occasioned by having to cite a heretic :-)

I also take your point, as far as finding the Positivist Catechism in English is concerned.  (The original can be had in a mass-market paperback reprint.  I read it in French.  But judging from a couple of errors in her footnote, I'm reasonably sure that Tara Smith doesn't know any French.)

However, the System of Positive Polity (of which the Catechism was intended to be a boiled-down presentation for female readers, who Comte was convinced were "emotionalistic") is probably easier to find in the English translations that were done in the 1870s than in the original.   Even our subpar library at Clemson has all four volumes, in a 1970s reprint edition.  And Comte's English translators meticulously provided his volumes with an index.  Looking up "altruism" is a good way to begin...

Robert Campbell


Sanction: 4, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 4, No Sanction: 0
Post 25

Tuesday, May 16, 2006 - 9:48amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
Stephen B,

I have more reading to do, before I get to Smith's appendix on friendship.

But I've already noticed some flailing in the chapter on honesty. Smith wants to cite Rand on how lying lowers the liar's self-esteem, but can't come up with anything. Meanwhile, a citation of Nathaniel Branden--even of his articles in The Objectivist Newsletter and The Objectivist--remains off-limits.

Robert Campbell



Post 26

Monday, April 30, 2007 - 12:15pmSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
 
 
This book by Tara Smith has now been reviewed by Diana Hsieh in The Objective Standard.


Post 27

Monday, April 30, 2007 - 1:18pmSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
Considering the amount of vitrolic irrationality seen displayed in Solo and NoodleFood by her, am astonished by this review having her name to it....

Post 28

Thursday, June 12, 2008 - 4:48amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
 
Fred Seddon has made his JARS review of Ayn Rand’s Normative Ethics available online here.
 
His review includes some of his criticisms of Rand’s ethical theory, which are among those given in the major critiques.

(Edited by Stephen Boydstun on 6/12, 4:54am)


Post 29

Friday, August 28, 2009 - 3:12amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit

Tara Smith’s Ayn Rand’s Normative Ethics: The Virtuous Egoist has been
reviewed by Carrie-Ann Biondi in Reason Papers 30(Fall 2008):91–105.

Shawn Klein has also reviewed this book in The New Individualist (Oct 2007).


Post 30

Friday, August 28, 2009 - 6:57amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
Klein indeed makes some valid points, and it would seem as if almost she, Tara Smith, ought to plan on books devoting to each of those specific virtues, giving then the needed detailed expositioning countering those other contemporary arguments - much in the same way Branden has done with a couple of those 'pillars' of self-esteem [self-responsibility, for instance]...

Post 31

Monday, September 28, 2009 - 3:39amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit

A short and insightful review by Stephen Hicks
of Tara Smith’s Ayn Rand’s Normative Ethics is available here.

Sanction: 17, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 17, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 17, No Sanction: 0
Post 32

Saturday, April 24, 2010 - 9:25amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit

There is a defect in what I had said in #20. I had written:

    In the Appendix to her new book, Professor Smith discusses egoist friendship. In a footnote, she remarks that Rand "believes that love can provide a unique type of self-awareness or visibility" (290). Smith neglected to give any references for this view of Rand's.

    The chief exposition of this fond view of Rand's is an essay in Rand's journal The Objectivist. It was written by Nathaniel Branden, and it is reprinted as the third of the essays assembled in Friendship: A Philosophical Reader, Neera Badhwar, editor.

    The dawn of the self-mirror view of romantic love is Rand's exquisite rendition of Dagny Taggart and John Galt together that night of nights in the railway tunnel . . . (956-57).

That last statement is not entirely right. There are red-lit clouds ahead of the dawn. The idea that romantic love entails self-mirroring is presaged in The Fountainhead. (Page citations are from the 1943 first edition; all emphases are mine.)

The steel frame of Howard Roark’s house for Austen Heller has been erected. On site the workers notice that Roark’s hands “reach out and run slowly down the beams and joints.” Workers say “‘That guy’s in love with the thing. He can’t keep his hands off’.” Absorbed in work at the site, Roark’s “own person vanished,” but “there were moments when something rose within him, not a thought nor a feeling, but a wave of some physical violence, and then he wanted to stop, to lean back, to feel the reality of his person heightened by the frame of steel that rose dimly about the bright, outstanding existence of his body at its center” (138).

Proceed from the literary foreplay at the Heller house to Dominique’s visits to Roark’s room and bed. “In his room, there was no necessity to . . . erase herself out of being. Here she was free to resist, to see her resistance welcomed by an adversary too strong to fear a contest, strong enough to need it; she found a will granting her the recognition of her own entity . . . . / . . . . It was an act of tension, as the great things on earth are things in tension. It was tense as electricity, the force fed on resistance . . .” (301).

On their last time, before they are separated for years, Roark says “‘I love you, Dominique. As selfishly as the fact that I exist. . . . I’ve given you . . . my ego and my naked need. This is the only way you can wish to be loved. This is the only way I can want you to love me’” (400; see also Wynand and Dominique, 539).

Roark and Dominique are definite entities, definite selves, exposed to each other. Their tensed sexual occasions heighten awareness of their selves, awareness of each to own-self and to other-self. (Cf. Sartre’s Being and Nothingness 1943, 505–14 in the translation by Hazel Barnes.)

In her marriage to Keating, Dominique is a non-entity. (No tension, strength, resistance, or ecstasy in bed.) Keating is a non-entity in most of his existence. Most all of his desires and candidate desires and most all of his opinions receive their value to him by their potential for impressing others. Dominique is a mirror to him, and she makes herself not more than a mirror (452–55). She says to Keating: “‘You wanted a mirror. People want nothing but mirrors around them. To reflect them while they’re reflecting too. You know, like the senseless infinity you get from two mirrors facing each other across a narrow passage. . . . Reflections of reflections . . . . No beginning and no end. No center and no purpose’”(455).


Sanction: 12, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 12, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 12, No Sanction: 0
Post 33

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 - 8:57amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit

I thought it might be useful to add here for reference the passage from Aristotle that portrays mirroring of one’s virtue in best friendships.
    If happiness lies in living and being active, and the good man’s activity is virtuous and pleasant in itself, as we have said at the outset, and if a thing’s being one’s own is one of he attributes that make it pleasant, and if we can contemplate our neighbors better than ourselves and their actions better than our own, and if the actions of virtuous men who are their friends are pleasant to good men* (since these have both the attributes that are naturally pleasant)—if this be so, the blessed man will need friends of this sort, since he chooses to contemplate worthy actions and actions that are his own, and the actions of a good man who is his friend have both these qualities. (Nicomachean Ethics 1169b29-1170a3, translation of Ross/Urmson)
*Concerning the good man, Rand writes of “the joy he receives from the virtues of another” (AS 1034).

How near ancient philosophers came to the Rand-Branden concept of mirroring in romantic love will have to wait.

Post 34

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 - 7:17pmSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
Thanks! For better or worse, this does not beg the easy replies that so much else here does. Not that we don't read, but only that we cannot declaim against it.


Post 35

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 - 8:25pmSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
Stephen is one of the sharpest of intellects, a very thoughtful and balanced mind who's style of writing shows a deep understanding of philosophic issues.
Often I don't have anything to say on anything he posts exept my deepest admiration as he has a beautiful mind and it is always a pleasure simply to sit back and read.

Post 36

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 - 10:36pmSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
I concur.

Post 37

Friday, January 20, 2012 - 6:11pmSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
For the record I do not often post long passages waxing poetic as I'm a pretty busy productive individual. Last year I worked 3562 hours so I take a bit of time here and there to post from my not very smart phone when I have a spare moment or two at work...

Ps I spelled "except" incorrectly in that last post, my apologies to the grammar police.

:)

Jules.

Post 38

Saturday, September 10 - 4:18amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit

 

 

 

Tara Smith's 2015 book Judicial Review in an Objective Legal System

has been reviewed by Carrie-Ann Biondi in Reason Papers right here.  

 

 

.

 

(Edited by Stephen Boydstun on 9/10, 4:46am)



Post to this threadBack one pagePage 0Page 1
[an error occurred while processing this directive]


User ID Password or create a free account.