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Post 40

Thursday, May 7, 2015 - 1:43pmSanction this postReply
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Nassar al-Ansi – Killed by USA



Post 41

Wednesday, May 13, 2015 - 7:46pmSanction this postReply
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Rot in pieces 😈



Post 42

Monday, May 18, 2015 - 5:15amSanction this postReply
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Abu Sayyaf – Killed by USA



Post 43

Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 3:42amSanction this postReply
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Nasir al-Wuhayshi Killed by USA

 

Ali Awni al-Harzi Killed by USA



Post 44

Saturday, July 11, 2015 - 10:02amSanction this postReply
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Hafiz Saeed – Killed by USA



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Post 45

Friday, September 25, 2015 - 7:54pmSanction this postReply
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Would you please list the number of innocent people the Jihadists have beheaded or otherwise murdered.  Your list of US killings says nothing about the deeds of those killed, whether they had it coming or not.



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Post 46

Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 4:52amSanction this postReply
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Junaid Hussain – Killed by USA

 

Tibor, the links supply the crimes of our targets. And as you might recognize, my research and composition hours are dedicated to philosophy in the areas shown here: A B (not political, military, or cultural). The first fifteen years after college I was a political activist and I studied and wrote in political philosophy, but in the last thirty, my specialties, as you can easily see from Objectivity (1990-98) and from these two links, are in philosophy not political. This thread, as far as my own contribution to it goes, is just quick notes on our successes against particular jihadi leaders and remembrances of the 9/ll atrocity. I'll continue it in that same way (regardless of who is President, our campaign will continue) and hope to live to see the day we get the other head remaining out there who attacked us on 9/11.

 

(Edited by Stephen Boydstun on 9/26, 4:54am)



Post 47

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 7:26amSanction this postReply
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A recent "fact check" of the 2016 candidates for President includes (NYT 11/18/15):

At a rally in Tennessee on Monday, three days after the terrorist attacks in Paris that killed 129 people, Donald J. Trump took credit for having “predicted Osama bin Laden” and “predicted terrorism” before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. “I can feel it,” he explained, likening his instinct to his ability to “feel good location” in real estate.

 

Mr. Trump did warn, in general terms, about the threat of terrorism. In “The America We Deserve,” a book he published in January 2000 when he was weighing an earlier presidential run, Mr. Trump wrote that he was “convinced we're in danger of the sort of terrorist attacks that will make the bombing of the Trade Center look like kids playing with firecrackers,” referring to the 1993 World Trade Center bombing that killed six people.

 

He devoted a chapter of the book to the subject of terrorism, focusing in large part on the threat of “biobombs." Mr. Trump warned that there was a “real possibility that somewhere, sometime, a weapon of mass destruction will be carried into a major American city and detonated.”

 

Contrary to his suggestion on Monday, Mr. Trump offered no specific prediction of a Bin Laden attack against the United States.

 

Instead, he briefly referred to the terrorist leader while discussing what he called the “haphazard, impulsive and unpredictable” nature of United States foreign policy.

 

Bin Laden was anything but an obscure figure at the time — Mr. Trump’s book came out a little over a year after the bombings of the American Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in August 1998, attacks for which Bin Laden had been indicted.

 

“One day we’re told that a shadowy figure with no fixed address named Osama bin-Laden is public enemy number one, and U.S. jet fighters lay waste to his camp in Afghanistan,” Mr. Trump wrote in the 2000 book. “He escapes back under some rock, and a few news cycles later it’s on to a new enemy and new crisis.”

 

At the time that Mr. Trump’s book was published, Bin Laden was on the F.B.I.’s list of its Ten Most Wanted Fugitives.

-----Thomas Kaplan

 

The blowhard force with Mr. Trump, strong is it. --SB

 

.

 

(Edited by Stephen Boydstun on 11/18, 8:39am)



Post 48

Tuesday, March 15, 2016 - 12:04amSanction this postReply
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Abu Omar Al-Shishani - Killed by USA



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Post 49

Monday, March 28, 2016 - 10:49pmSanction this postReply
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Abu Omar Al-Shishani - Killed by USA

 

All the killings of individual jihadists don't put a dent into the Islamists crusade.  For every first or second in command that is killed, another quickly takes his place. 

 

What is necessary to eliminate the terrorist threat is to attack and eliminate its source, which is the oil money and support coming from places like Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Dubai and, of course, Iran.  The Saudis propagandize their youth from early childhood in the madrassas to hate the Jews and the infidels.  Saudi children are thus primed for radicalization.  The funding and support coming from these wealthy Middle Eastern states must be eliminated before ISIS, al Qaeda, Hamas, etc., can be defeated.

 

Periodically killing individual leaders accomplishes very little.  There are always others who can and do take their place.



Post 50

Tuesday, March 29, 2016 - 9:07amSanction this postReply
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Bill,

 

I agree.  Killing leaders is a good way to slow them up (and an act of justice), but cutting off the source of their funds is much more powerful inhibition.  Also, especially with ISIS, taking away their land - their Caliphate - would be an excellent step.  It hits them in an area they hold ideologically dear, as well as denying them a safe place to sit while raising money, training, recruiting and organizing. 

 

But the biggest and best step is to divide them from the moderate Muslims in a way that encourages the moderates to modify Islam - to reform their beliefs, taking out the political aspects and rejecting them.  This not only is a solid step towards succeeding in the ideological side of the war, but it means that a military/police force could form that we could ally with to have local control of newly taken territory.  There has to be a functional replacement for the strong-man dictators that will police the area against Islamists.  If it is an all Arab, all muslim force it will re-enforce the reformist movement by showing the difference between moderates and fundamentalists.  As the young begin to adopt a philosophy they need to see fundamentalism ridiculed by local, respected, Arab Muslim leaders.



Post 51

Sunday, April 10, 2016 - 9:30amSanction this postReply
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Very doubtful that Islam will ever be reformed.  The very act of changing the words of God would be considered blasphemy.



Post 52

Sunday, April 10, 2016 - 12:44pmSanction this postReply
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Jules,

 

It only seems that way because you approach the issue with reason. 

 

It would look like a movement where people were arguing a more rational approach to what a peaceful, non-political, Islam would look like, and there would be some theological slight-of-hand by important, moderate Islamic leaders to explain why this or that part of the scripture was not really being rewritten, and that slight-of-hand would explain why this was NOT changing the words of Allah, but rather being more true to his actual words.  (Keep in mind that religion is mumbo-jumo to start with and has never made any literal sense.)

 

Then would come the great divide - the people on one side who want a peaceful religion and have never liked the militant side of Islam, and the fundamentalist on the other side.  It would sound a little like they were making arguments based upon reason, but in fact it would be a struggle of peer-pressure and emotional appeals.  It would grow heated and everyone who is a muslim would have to take a side, and the fundamentalists would be severely marginalized and become outcasts.  Maybe there would be new sects open up in the moderate Islam for peaceful fundamentalism (lots of prayers, dietary restrictions, beards, etc. - but no sharia or jihad.) 

 

You can't reason people (moderates or fundamentalists) out of positions that they never reasoned themselves into.  This would be an emotion-based movement.

 

But this reform won't happen until there is a very strong emotional impetus.  There has to be great pressure in society before this would happen.  Political correctness and a failure of different governments to go after fundamentalist Islam keeps the moderates from having to separate themselves.  There is almost zero pressure, now, to overthrow milenia of religious inertia and to suffer the disquiet of dropping this sura in exchange for that sura, and to take an adversarial stance.



Post 53

Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 1:17amSanction this postReply
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Taliban leader Mullah Mansour likely killed by USA in drone strike in Pakistan.



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Post 54

Sunday, June 5, 2016 - 5:18amSanction this postReply
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As it is said, "It is not our duty to judge him. Only God can do that. Our duty is to see that the meeting takes place."

 

(Edited by Michael E. Marotta on 6/05, 5:19am)



Post 55

Saturday, September 8 - 2:22pmSanction this postReply
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Ayman al-Zawahiri still at large.

 

(Edited by Stephen Boydstun on 9/08, 2:26pm)



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