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Post 40

Tuesday, January 6, 2009 - 10:35pmSanction this postReply
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Mindy,

I find it a pleasing picture, relaxing, but it doesn't fire me up. There needs to be an intimation of passion, or romance, or power, or boldness, or sensuality, or challenge, or accomplishment, or intense joy that I want to 'see' in a painting before I'm fired up.



Post 41

Tuesday, January 6, 2009 - 11:09pmSanction this postReply
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I can't get finished looking at it. and when I go back, my eyes keep roving over it, searching. I can't seem to get finished. I don't know if it's the analytical mind-set I've got, or what. 
I keep thinking the light isn't painted at all--you can't see where he painted the light. 
The down-turned eyes and face make one think of a madonna, no?
I grew up with this picture on the wall, yet I don't know how I feel about it.




Post 42

Wednesday, January 7, 2009 - 6:00amSanction this postReply
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I find it a pleasing picture, relaxing, but it doesn't fire me up. There needs to be an intimation of passion, or romance, or power, or boldness, or sensuality, or challenge, or accomplishment, or intense joy that I want to 'see' in a painting before I'm fired up.
..............

Do you prefer this, then, to landscapes - which also lacks those? if so, why?




Post 43

Wednesday, January 7, 2009 - 10:48amSanction this postReply
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I can't come close to saying I prefer this to landscapes...too categorical.
This picture is intriguing in that I keep wanting to look around it and over the lighted parts. I don't like the dark, muddy corners, but I am "caught" looking around the center of the picture, the bread and her stance, her bodice and arms, the relaxed hands, then the bread. I love the bread. It's not a thinking thing, for sure. It seems like I'm missing something that puts it all together. I look around, within it, but I don't see the whole thing, somehow. I'm feeling foolish about it.

What about the three still lives? I find the first very unsettling and unsatisfactory. The objects are not distinct, the water glass merges with the wall behind it, the white cloth on the table runs into the white fruit bowl, the pieces of fruit are misshapen, and not appetizing. The table's surfaces aren't four-square. There's something about the proportions of the fruit in the bowl versus the pieces on the table...  




Post 44

Wednesday, January 7, 2009 - 8:48pmSanction this postReply
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I am sorry, Mindy, what still lifes?



Post 45

Wednesday, January 7, 2009 - 8:55pmSanction this postReply
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In post 22, here, Stephen has a link to three still lives, which were being analyzed for metaphysical value-judgements. Take a look at them.



Post 46

Wednesday, January 7, 2009 - 9:29pmSanction this postReply
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Was trying to find a larger view of Kalf's, but not... from what of his other works, this is an exception to how he usually painted, namely with a deep dark single light projection...

however, as in his others, he shows an abundance of opulence, quality wares not usual in most households, along with fine foods not generally so easily gotten... taking this with the extreme realism of his technique, this displays a toast, as it were, to successful living - a celebrating of the 'good life', which in turn is an affirmation that a good life is possible, and desirable... further, this good life is widespaced, as the items are gathered from far places - a cosmopolitan outlook of the world, rather than the provincialism otherwise...



Post 47

Wednesday, January 7, 2009 - 10:07pmSanction this postReply
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Cezanne

Photobucket

Kalf

Photobucket

Paul S. Brown

Photobucket




Post 48

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 5:16amSanction this postReply
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Brown's work indicates that in reality, life is just short, and decays fast - note the overripe pears..... one could also say bland, as these fruits are not the most fragrant, as per oranges, say [which also last much longer]... the palette also shows a blandness - while faithful to how these fruits look, there is little of positive appeal... the cloth is of good quality, which implies the balefulness of acquiring riches [note the lack of anything further in refinement]...

or so it seems to me......
(Edited by robert malcom on 1/08, 5:17am)




Post 49

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 10:28amSanction this postReply
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“Brown's work indicates that in reality, life is just short, and decays fast”

No kidding. One of the pears has keeled over, dead.



(Edited by Jon Letendre on 1/08, 10:29am)




Post 50

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 12:54pmSanction this postReply
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I'm with you, Jon. I would add that there is a tease here, also. The rendering of the plums and the play of light is wonderful and inviting, yet everything, the pears, the wall behind, the table cloth, is smudged and spoiled. I think he is painting life as disappointing, too.



Post 51

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 1:28pmSanction this postReply
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The Cezanne simply looks boring in comparison. The Kalf looks cluttered, overly formal, poorly composed (the bottom two fifths of the painting is a waste.) The Brown looks delicious. The pears are not overripe, the coloring near the stem is not rot, but the redness of that variety. The blemishes are fine, had he omitted them the painting would have looked airbrushed. I would have liked Brown to be a bit more dynamic, perhaps a red rose in a cobalt blue vase, but his is the only painting on which I would consider spending money.



Post 52

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 2:03pmSanction this postReply
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Hmmm Ted. I wonder what this says about your psycho-epistemology? :-)



Post 53

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 2:10pmSanction this postReply
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I should add, too, that the plums being 'just right', and the pears overripe also implies those who rise above the rest rot faster, so in effect this is an egalitarian view here...

Yes, Jeff - so true there... why am not surprised...



Post 54

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 2:19pmSanction this postReply
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Probably all three of these guys were just thinking, "Maybe it would be fun to paint some fruit. Let's see what I got?" :-)

(Whoops, I realized that the smiley is insufficient, so ..... just kidding folks!)

(Oh yeah, and the bad grammer was intentional too!!!)


(Edited by C. Jeffery Small on 1/08, 2:22pm)




Post 55

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 2:24pmSanction this postReply
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Kalf did still lifes like that for a living, doing many variations, some using blue china bowls, tall copper beverage containers, finely ornate, with lobsters and such - all showing the finery of 'the good' life' for others to hang and contemplate on...

However, none of these would interest me to hanging on my wall...
(Edited by robert malcom on 1/08, 2:26pm)




Post 56

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 2:35pmSanction this postReply
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The Kalf is un-inviting. The food being eaten is unappealing. Notice the bleached-out color of the lemon and grapes. The plate holding the lemon and the grapes is almost falling off the table, it is as if the formal element leaves little space for the human, nutritive one...?



Post 57

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 3:05pmSanction this postReply
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Those are olives.

I.e., pickled grapes.



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Post 58

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 3:13pmSanction this postReply
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The top-left olive should have rolled down amongst the other two, what’s it doing up there at the rim of the plate?

I think it is wedged against the tray.

It is keeping the plate from falling!

This painting is all about the little guy and the myriad of mostly unnoticed ways he keeps things together.





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Post 59

Thursday, January 8, 2009 - 3:28pmSanction this postReply
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Jon,
The top-left olive was rolling down toward the others.  You just can't see it because IT'S A STILL LIFE!




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